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Prof. Dr. Mathias Frisch

CV

Mathias Frisch studied philosophy and physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich and the University of California in Berkeley. After his departure from Munich he was awarded a Bachelor of Arts (1990) and a Master of Arts (1992) in physics at Berkeley, before completing his PhD (1998) on the role of models in scientific explanation. He was an assistant professor at Northwestern University from 1998-2003. From 2003-2015 he was employed by the University of Maryland, becoming a “full professor” in autumn of 2013. From 2011-2013 Mathias Frisch was a guest professor at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy at the LMU; since then he has held the position of permanent visiting professor. He has been a research associate at the Centre for the Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences at the London School of Economics since 2008. Mathias Frisch has been the Professor for Theoretical Philosophy, in particular philosophy of science, at the Leibniz University Hannover since February 2016.

Areas of Expertise in Research and Teaching

  • General Philosophy of Science

  • Philosophy of Physics

  • Philosophy and Climate Change

Publications

Monographs

Inconsistency, Asymmetry, and Non-Locality:  A Philosophical Investigation of Classical Electrodynamics, New York: Oxford University Press (2005).

Causal Reasoning in Physics, Cambridge University Press (2014).

Journal Articles

Philosophy and Climate Change

“Tuning climate models, predictivism, and the problem of old evidence” European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5:2 (May 2015). 171-190.

“Modeling Climate Policies: A Critical Look at Integrated Assessment Models”, Philosophy and Technology 26 (2013). 117-137.

“Climate Change Justice,” Philosophy and Public Affairs (Summer 2012). 225-253.

 

Philosophy of Physics and General Philosophy of Science

“Reassessing the Ritz-Einstein debate on the radiation asymmetry in classical electrodynamics" Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics  55, August (2016). 13-23.

“Users, Structures, and Representations” British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66:2 (2015). 285-306.

“Who is Afraid of Inconsistency?” Synthese Vol. 191, 13 (2014). 3027-3040.

“Laws in Physics”, European Review 22, Suppl. S1 (May 2014). S33-S49.

“Classical Electrodynamics:  no more toils and troubles?”, Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics  44, 4 (2013). 527-531.

“Physics and the Human Face of Causation,” Topoi 33, 2 (2014). 407-419. DOI 10.1007/s11245-013-9172-0.

No Place for Causes? Causal Skepticism in Physics." European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2:3 (October 2012). 313-336.

“From Boltzmann to Arbuthnot: higher-level laws and the Best System,” Philosophy of Science 78: (2011:5). 1001-1011.

“Principle or Constructive Relativity?” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 42 (2011), 176-183.

“Causes, Counterfactuals, and Non-Locality,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 88/4 (2010), 655 – 672.

“Causality and dispersion: a reply to John Norton,” British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (September 2009), 487-495.

“‘The most Sacred Tenet’? Causal Reasoning in Physics,” British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (September 2009), 459-474.

“Philosophical Issues in Electromagnetism,” Philosophy Compass 4/1 (2009): 255–270.

“Conceptual Problems in Classical Electrodynamics,” Philosophy of Science 75:1 (January 2008), 93-105.

“A Tale of Two Arrows,” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 37 (2006), 542-558.

“Counterfactuals and the Past Hypothesis,” Philosophy of Science 72: 5 (December 2005), 739–750.

“Mechanisms, Principles, and Lorentz’s Cautious Realism,” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36, 4 (December 2005), 659-679.

“Laws and Initial Conditions,” Philosophy of Science 71:5 (December 2004), 696-706

“Inconsistency in Classical Electrodynamics,” Philosophy of Science 71 (October 2004), 525-549.

“Non-Locality in Classical Electrodynamics,” British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (March 2002), 1-19.

“(Dis-)Solving the Puzzle of the Arrow of Radiation,” British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (September 2000), 381-410

“Van Fraassen’s Dissolution of Putnam’s Model-Theoretic Argument,” Philosophy of Science, 66 (March 1999), 158-164.

Articles in Edited Volumes

Philosophy and Climate Change

“Uncertainty and Values in climate policy optimization models,” in Winsberg, E. and Lloyd, E., eds., Conceptual Foundations of Climate Modeling, The University of Chicago Press (forthcoming).

 

Philosophy of Physics and General Philosophy of Science

“Unsharp Humean Chances in Statistical Physics: a Reply to Beisbart” together with Luke Glynn, Radin Dardashti, and Karim Theabault in New Directions in the Philosophy of Science, eds. M. Galavotti, et al. (2014).  531-542.

“Statistical mechanics and the asymmetry of causal influence,” in David Albert’s Time and Chance, eds. Barry Loewer, Eric Winsberg, and Brad Weslake, Harvard University Press (forthcoming).

“Why Physics Can’t Explain Everything,” in Chance and Temporal Asymmetry, ed. Alastair Wilson, Oxford University Press (2014). 221-240.

“Time and Causation,” in A Companion to the Philosophy of Time, eds. Heather Dykes and Adrian Bardon. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell (2013). 282-300.

“Kausalität in der Physik,” in Philosophie der Physik, ed. Michael Esfeld, Suhrkamp (2012).

“Causal Models and the Asymmetry of State Preparation” in EPSA Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Launch of the European Philosophy of Science Association, eds. M. Suárez, M. Dorato and M. Rédei. Springer Verlag (2010).

“Does a low-Entropy constraint prevent us from influencing the Past?,” in Time, Chance, and Reduction, eds. Andreas Hüttemann and Gerhard Ernst, Cambridge University Press (2010), 13-33.

“Causation, Counterfactuals and Entropy,” in  Russell's Republic: The Place of Causation in the Constitution of Reality, eds. Huw Price and Richard Corry, Oxford University Press (2007), 351-395.

“A New Look at Popper’s Pond,” in Karl Popper: A Centenary Assessment, ed. Ian Jarvie, Ashgate (2007), 77-84.

Contact Details

Professor Dr. Mathias Frisch
Institut für Philosophie
Leibniz Universität Hannover
Im Moore 21 (Hinterhaus)
30167 Hannover

Raum B404 (4. OG)

Tel.: +49 (0) 511 / 762-5151

Fax: +49 (0) 511 / 762-5720

Email: mathias.frischphilos.uni-hannover.de

Office Hours

During the teaching period: Tuesday 10am-12pm
Outside the teaching period: by appointment