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Prof. Dr. Uljana Feest

Uljana Feest

Curriculum Vitae

Uljana Feest studied psychology, philosophy and history and philosophy of science (HPS) in Frankfurt, Bristol and Pittsburgh. After completing her psychology degree at the Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt (1994), she worked for a couple of years as a researcher in an interdisciplinary project at a Frankfurt-based research institute (Institut für Sozial-Oekologische Forschung), before taking up graduate work in philosophy of science. From 1997-2003 she was a graduate student at the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh, completing her dissertation, Operationism, Experimentation, and Concept Formation, in August 2003

From 2003-2006, Uljana Feest was a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Berlin) and then held a position as assistant professor at the Technische Universität (TU) Berlin from 2006 to 2012. She has been a visiting researcher at the University of Pittsburg, the University of Michigan and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development (Berlin). Since March 2014, she is professor of philosophy at the Leibniz University of Hannover, where she holds the chair for Philosophy of Social Science and Social Philosophy.

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Guidelines for seminar papers (german)

Main areas of research and teaching

  • general philosophy of science
  • epistemology of experiment
  • philosophy and history of psychology and the human sciences
  • history of analytical philosophy and of philosophy of science

Teaching

Prof. Feest teaches introductory and advanced courses on general philosophy of science, philosophy of psychology, philosophy of social science, philosophy of experimentation, ethics of research, history of modern philosophy, and others

In 2010 she was one of three invited lecturers at the Vienna International Summer University (VISU). The topic of the course was "The Science of the Conscious Mind". www.univie.ac.at/ivc/VISU/

Publications

Monographs

  • Feest, U.: Operationism and the Epistemology of Discovery in Experimental Psychology (in progress).

Edited Volumes and special editions

  • Feest, U. (Ed.), 2012, “Current Topics in the Philosophy of the Human Sciences,” Inquiry, 55(1), special issue.
  • Feest, U. & Steinle, F., (Eds.), 2012, Scientific Concepts and Investigative Practice. Berlin: DeGruyter.
  • Feest, U. & Sturm, T. (Eds.), 2011, “What (Good) is Historical Epistemology?” Erkenntnis 75, special issue.
  • Feest, U., (Ed.), 2010, Historical Perspectives on Erklären and Verstehen. Dordrecht: Springer
  • Adams, A.; Biener, Z.; Feest; U. & Sullivan, J (Eds.), Oppure Si Mouve: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer. The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science. Dordrecht: Springer. (Scheduled for publication in 2016)

Article in peer-reviewed journals

  • Feest, U. „The Experimenters’ Regress Reconsidered: Tacit Knowledge, Skepticism, and the Dynamics of Knowledge Generation“. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 58, 34-54.
  • Feest, U. “Phenomenal Experiences, First-Person Methods, and the Artificiality of Experimental Data.” Philosophy of Science 81, 927-39
  • Feest, U., 2012a, “Introspection as a Method and Introspection as a Feature of Consciousness.” Inquiry 55 (1), 1-16.
  • Feest, U., 2012b, “Husserl’s Crisis as a Crisis of Psychology.” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Science 43 (2): 493-503.
  • Feest, U., 2011a, “Remembering (Short-Term) Memory. Oscillations of an Epistemic Thing.” Erkenntnis 75, 391–411.
  • Feest, U., 2011b. “What Exactly is Stabilized When Phenomena are Stabilized?” Synthese 182(1), 57-71.
  • Feest, U. & Sturm, T., 2011, “What (Good) is Historical Epistemology?” In T. Sturm & U. Feest (eds.), Special issue of Erkenntnis about Historical Epistemology. Erkenntnis 75, 285–302.
  • Feest, U., 2010, “Concepts as Tools in the Experimental Generation of Knowledge in Cognitive Neuropsychology.”  Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science, 4(1), 173-190.
  • Feest, U., 2007a, “‘Hypotheses, Everywhere Only Hypotheses!’ On Some Contexts of Dilthey’s Critique of Explanatory Psychology.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38(1), 43-62.
  • Feest, U., 2007b, “Science and Experience – Science of Experience: Gestalt Psychology and the Anti-Metaphysical Project of the Aufbau.”  Perspectives on Science 15(1), 38-62.
  • Feest, U., 2005, “Operationism in Psychology - What the Debate is About, What the Debate Should Be About.”  Journal for the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 41(2), 131-150. Portugese translation: “O Operacionismo na Psicologie: Sobre o que é o Debate, sobre o que Deveria Ser o Debate.” In Saulo de Fraitas Araujo (ed.) (2012), História e Filosofia da Psichologia. Perspectivas Contemporâneas, Juiz de Fora: UFJF, 259-296.
  • Feest, U., 2003, “Functional Analysis and the Autonomy of Psychology.”  Philosophy of Science, 70(5), 937-948.

Article in edited volumes

  • Feest, U., “Quantifying Gestalt Qualities: Modernism and the Measurement of Experience”.  In M. Epple & F. Müller, (Eds.), Modernism in the Sciences. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag (forthcoming).
  • Feest, U. „Physicalism, Introspection, and Psychophysics: The Carnap/Duncker Exchange“. In Adams, A.;Biener, Z.; Feest; U. & Sullivan, J (Eds.), Oppure Si Mouve: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer. The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science. Dordrecht: Springer. (forthcoming)
  • “Philosophie der Psychologie.” Contribution to the Philosophie der Einzelwissenschaften (edited by Simon Lohse und Thomas Reydon, Hamburg: Meiner-Verlag). (In print)
  • “Experiment.” Contirbution to the Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Science (edited by Paul Humphreys). Gemeinsam mit Friedrich Steinle. (In print)
  • Feest, U., 2014, “The Enduring Relevance of 19th-Century Philosophy of Psychology: Brentano and the Autonomy of Psychology.” Proceedings of Conference Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective. Edited by Thomas Uebel. Dordrecht: Springer
  • Feest, U., 2012, “Exploratory Experiments, Concept Formation and Theory Construction in Psychology.” In U. Feest & F. Steinle (Eds.), Scientific Concepts and Investigative Practice. Berlin: de Gruyter, 167-189.
  • Feest, U. & Steinle, F. (Eds.), 2012, “Scientific Concepts and Investigative Practice: Introduction.” In U. Feest & F. Steinle (Eds.), Scientific Concepts and Investigative Practice. Berlin: de Gruyter, 1-23.
  • Feest, U., 2010, “Historical Perspectives on Erklären and Verstehen: Introduction”.  In U. Feest (Ed.): Historical Perspectives on Erklären and Verstehen. Dordrecht: Springer, 1-13.
  • Feest, U., 2005, “Giving Up Instincts In Psychology – Or Not?”  In B. Gómez-Zúñiga & A. Mülberger (Eds.): Recent Contributions to the History of the Human Sciences. Munich: Profil-Verlag, 242-259.
  • Feest, U., 2002, “Die Konstruktion von Bewußtsein. Eine psychologiehistorische Fallstudie”. In Claus Zittel (Ed.): Wissen und soziale Konstruktion. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 129-153.

Selected Recent and Upcoming Talks and Comments (since 2010)

  • “Phenomena and Objects of Research in the Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences”, 25. Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Atlanta, November 2016.
  • “Conceptual articulation and the experimental creation of phenomena: the role of scientific method(ology).” Invited talk at symposium about J. Rouse’s book: Articulating the World. Conceptual Understanding and the Scientific Image. Freie Universität Berlin, March 2016
  • “Commentary on Markus Eronen: 'Science without levels‘”. Workshop: Patterns in Science. Berlin Mind & Brain School, December 2015 (with Sheldon Chow)
  • “What are phenomena in the cognitive and behavioral sciences?” Conference of the European Philosophy of Science Association (EPSA), Düsseldorf, September 2015
  • “Phänomene in den Kognitions- und Verhaltenswissenschaften.“ Lecture at the Universität Bielefeld, July 2015
  • “What are phenomena in the cognitive and behavioral sciences?” Lecture at the Universität Graz, June 2015
  • “Construct Validity in Psychological Tests – The Case of Implicit Social Cognition.” Lecture at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP), January 2015
  • “Darf Wissenschaft täuschen? Ethische Probleme in den Sozialwissenschaften.” Lecture in the series Wissenschaft in der Verantwortung, Verantwortung in der Wissenschaft, Leibniz Universität Hannover, December 2014
  • “Physicalism, Introspection, and Psychophysics: The Carnap/Duncker Exchange.” 25th Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Chicago, November 2014
  •  “Physicalism, Introspection, and Psychophysics: The Carnap/Duncker Exchange.” Conference History of the Philosophy of Science (HOPOS), Gent (Belgium), July 2014
  • “Stimulus Error and the Red Herring of Introspection.” Conference: Integrated HPS 5, Vienna (Austria), June 2014.
  • “Test Validity and the Problematic Status of Implicit Social Cognition.” Workshop: Experiment, Conceptual Change, and Scientific Realism, Athens (Greece), May 2014
  • “Experiments and the Method of Converging Operations.” Conference: Causality and Experimentation in Science. Paris, July 1-3, 2013
  • “Introspection and the Artificiality of Experimental Data.” 24th Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association. San Diego, November 2012
  • "The Enduring Relevance of 19th-Century Philosophy of Psychology.” Conference Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective, Bologna, October 17-21, 2012.
  • “First-Person Methods and the Design of Éxperiments.” Conference Should a Science of Cognition use First-Person Methods? Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, June 15-16, 2012.
  • “The Experimenters’ Regress Reconsidered: Tacit Knowledge, Operational Analysis, and the Scientific Process.” University of Texas, El Paso, February 2, 2012.
  • “Experimentation and the Skeptical Challenge: The Role of Methodological Maxims.” Conference Philosophy of Scientific Experimentation: A Challenge to Philosophy of Science, Pittsburgh, October 15-17, 2010.
  • “Revisiting the Brentano Puzzle: The Autonomy of Psychology and the Shifting Status of Conscious Experience.” Conference of the European Society for the History of the Human Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 23-27, 2010.

Professional service and membership

  • Member of executive board of the Gesellschaft für Wissenschaftsphilosophie (GWP) (German society for philosophy of science), since July 2013.
  • Member of program committee for the meeting of the International Society for the History of the Philosophy of Science (HOPOS), Halifax, Canada, June 2012.
  • Member of program committee for European Philosophy of Science Association (EPSA) Meeting, Athens, October 2011.
  • Member of program committee for the 2011 and 2012 meetings of the European Society for the History of the Human Sciences (ESHHS), Belgrade, July 2011 and Montreal, July 2012.
  • Editorial board of the Journal for the History of the Behavioral Sciences.
  • Secretary and member of the Executive Board of the European Society for the History of the Human Sciences (ESHHS), 2007-2012.
  • Member of the Philosophy of Science Association (PSA), Gesellschaft für analytische Philosophie (GAP), International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS), Gesellschaft für Wissenschaftsgeschichte (GeWiGe), Gesellschaft für Wissenschaftsphilosophie (GWP)
  • Member of the 2010/2011 Elections- and Nominations Committee of the International Society for the History of the Philosophy of Science (HOPOS).
  • Referee for International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Perspectives on Science, Philosophical Psychology, Journal of Philosophical Research, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), Herta Firnberg Stiftung, European Science Foundation, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Science, Science in Context.

Organization of conferences and administrative experience

Conferences Organized

  • Workshop in Honor of James Bogen, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, März 2015 (gemeinsam mit Holly Andersen, Brian Keeley & Peter Machamer)
  • “Current Topics in the Philosophy of the Human Sciences.” Technische Universität Berlin, June 17-19, 2010.
  • “Scientific Concepts and Investigative Practice.” Technische Universität Berlin, May 22/23, 2009 (with Friedrich Steinle).
  • “What (Good) is Historical Epistemology?” Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, July 24-26, 2008 (with Thomas Sturm).
  • “Generating Experimental Knowledge.” University of Wuppertal (Germany), June 14-16, 2007 (hosted by Friedrich Steinle).
  • “Historical Perspectives on Erklären and Verstehen.” Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, June 9-11, 2006.
  • “Generating Knowledge with the Microscope.” Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, June 24-26, 2006 (with Jutta Schickore).

Administrative Experience

2004-2007: Scientific coordinator of the project, “Generating Experimental Knowledge: Experimental Systems, Concept Formation and the Pivotal Role of Error”. A cooperation between the MPI for the History of Science (Prof. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger) and the University of Haifa (Prof. Giora Hon). Funded by the German-Israeli Foundation for Research and Development (Jerusalem).

Scholarship and awards

  • 2011-2012: Visiting Fellow, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh.
  • 2003: ‘Early Career Award.’ European Society for the History of the Human Sciences (ESHHS) and Journal for the History of the Behavioral Sciences (JHBS).
  • 2003-2004: Post-doctoral fellowship, Max Planck Institute for History of Science (Berlin).
  • 2002-2003: Andrew Mellon pre-doctoral fellowship (University of Pittsburgh).
  • 1997-1998: fellowship by the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Program).  Visiting scholar at the HPS department, University of Pittsburgh

Contact

Prof. Dr. Uljana Feest

Institute of Philosophy

Leibniz University of Hannover

Im Moore 21

D-30167 Hannover

Room B409

Tel.: +49(0)511 762-14335

E-Mail: feestphilos.uni-hannover.de

Office hours

During the semester: Tuesdays 3:00-4:00 pm

Otherwise: by appointment.